• Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image
  • Image

Methods

The kindergarten is organised according to the principle of ‘open doors’, which has proven to be very successful and is evident through great results and children’s interest. Work according to the aforementioned principle enables better work quality, allows children the freedom to choose activities which will satisfy their desire to learn, play and express their creativity. Methods

Kindergarten ‘Kreativan razvoj’ functions in three age groups:


LION CUBS (up to 3 years of age)
CREATIVES (from 3 to 5 years of age)
LIONS (preschoolers)


The kindergarten is organised according to the principle of ‘open doors’, which has proven to be very successful and is evident through great results and children’s interest. Work according to the aforementioned principle enables better work quality, allows children the freedom to choose activities which will satisfy their desire to learn, play and express their creativity. On the other hand, it is required that children, together with their teachers, cover more demanding tasks and activities within their age group.


Our environment is completely adapted for the maximum development of motor and cognitive skills. In addition, children have various objects, tools and materials at their disposal, especially natural materials (exploration of shape, colour, smell, and taste). In our work we learn by doing and the environment is yet another teacher offering multiple possibilities to be active, numerous types of stimuli and complete freedom to use everything offered. This approach to education contributes to the development of child’s independence and self-reliance, helps their intellectual development, development of psychomotor skills, development of speech, and as a continuation of that, development of basic reading and writing skills. Moreover, it encourages exploration, symbolic play, free expression of emotions and self-respect, as well as accepting differences and tolerance.


Daily rest is organised to fulfill children’s actual needs, meaning that children ‘do not have to sleep’. Sleeping is not mandatory and the choice is possible. For the children who do need to sleep (especially the younger children), daily rest is organised in the rest room, while other children, who are occupied with other activities, do not disturb their sleep.